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Monday, June 24, 2013

The Finest Steel Come From The Hottest Furnaces

I’ll never forget the night in 1946 when disaster and challenge visited our home.

My brother, George, came home from football practice and collapsed with a temperature of 104 degrees. After an examination, the doctor informed us it was polio. This was before the days of Dr. Salk, and polio was well known in Webster Groves, Missouri, having killed and crippled many children and teenagers.

After the initial crisis passed, the doctor felt duty bound to inform George of the horrible truth. “I hate to tell you this, son,” he said, “but the polio has taken such a toll that you’ll probably never walk again without a limp, and your left arm will be useless.”

George had always envisioned himself as a championship wrestler for his senior year, after just missing it the season before while he was a junior. Barely able to speak, George whispered, “Doctor…”

“Yes,” said the doctor leaning over the bed, “what is it, my boy?”

“Go to hell,” said George in a voice filled with determination.

You see, Mom and Dad taught us that just like you would never let someone else come into your house with an axe and allow them to break up your furniture, you should never let a damaging thought come into your mind and break up your dreams.

The next day the nurse walked into George’s room to find him lying flat on his face on the floor.
“What’s going on in here?” asked the shocked nurse.

“I’m walking,” George calmly replied.

George refused the use of any braces or even a crutch that was given to him. Sometimes it would take him 20 minutes just to get out of the chair, but he refused any offers of aid.

I remember seeing him lift a tennis ball with as much effort as a healthy man would need to lift a 100-pound barbell.

I also remember seeing him, six months later, step out on the mat as captain of the wrestling team. George’s rehabilitation from the devastating effects of polio was written up all over the state of Missouri. No one had ever been known to recover so quickly or so completely from this disease.
The story continues. The next year, after being named to start for Missouri Valley College in one of the first football games to be televised locally, George came down with mononucleosis.

It was my brother Bob who helped reinforce George’s already strong philosophy of never giving up.
The family was sitting in George’s room at the hospital, watching the game on TV, when Valley’s quarterback completed a 12-yard pass to the tight end. Then the announcer said, “And George Schlatter makes the first catch of the game.”

Shocked, we all looked at the bed to make sure George was still there. Then we realized what had happened. Bob, who had made the starting line-up, had worn George’s number so George could spend the afternoon hearing himself catching six passes and making countless tackles. Later he said, “If I can do that flat on my back with a temperature of 103 degrees, just think what I can do when I’m up!”
As he overcame mono, he did it with the lesson Bob taught him that day…there is always a way!
George was destined to spend the next three falls seasons in the hospital. In 1948, it was after he stepped on a rusty nail. In 1949, it was tonsillitis, just before he was to sing in an audition for Phil Harris, a great orchestra leader and radio comedy icon. And in 1950, it was third-degree burns over 40 percent of his body and collapsed lungs. After an explosion had set George’s body on fire, my brother Alan put the flames out by throwing himself on George. Alan had saved his brother’s life, but he received serious burns himself.

Following each challenge, George came back stronger and surer of his own ability to overcome any obstacle. He had read that if one looks at the roadblocks, he isn’t looking at the goal.

Armed with these gifts, he entered the world of show business and revolutionized television by creating and producing such innovative shows as Laugh In and The American Comedy Awards. He also won an Emmy for his production of Sammy Davis Jr.’s 60th Anniversary Celebration Special.
He had literally been through the furnace and come out of it with a soul as strong as steel, and he used it to strengthen and entertain a nation.

Of course, the four of us didn’t always get a long, but we were brothers through and through, and yet… out of the conflicts came new respect and even memories about which we would later laugh.

By John Wayne “Jack” Schlatter

The 18 Worst Things For Left-Handed People

1. Spiral Notebooks

Spiral Notebooks
Hurts the side of your hand. The worst are the 5-subject with the extra big rings.

Source: buy.com

2. Writing in a 3-ring binder

Writing in a 3-ring binder
You have to do that thing where you fit your hand between the top two, then eventually have to pick it up and fit it in between the bottom two.

Source: flickr.com

3. Only 1 gross lefty glove in gym class

Only 1 gross lefty glove in gym class
The handsweat of a thousand lefties before you.

4. Only 2 pairs of the green lefty scissors in class, 3 lefty kids.

Only 2 pairs of the green lefty scissors in class, 3 lefty kids.
Scrambling through the scissors to find the ones with the green rubber handles, only to see they’re already all gone.

Source: lennydavinci

5. Ballpoint pens don’t work as well because you’re pushing, not pulling the ball

Ballpoint pens don't work as well because you're pushing, not pulling the ball
The ink will never flow as well for lefties, so our pens stop up more.

6. Ink all over the side of your hand

Ink all over the side of your hand
Source: alithinks

7. Bonking elbows with a righty at the dinner table

Bonking elbows with a righty at the dinner table
Source: juliejigsaw

8. iPad Kindle app - left side is back page

iPad Kindle app - left side is back page
This is really annoying - if you prefer to hold it in your left hand, you have to move your hand all the way to the other side to tap. On a real Kindle, page forward is on both sides, thankfully.

Source: dmh650

9. Driver’s cup holder is for the right hand

Driver's cup holder is for the right hand
So you have to hold your cup with your right hand.

Source: bimmerfest.com

10. Numberpad is on the righthand side of keyboard

Numberpad is on the righthand side of keyboard
Source: bernskiold.com

11. Dying sooner, so becoming a zombie sooner

Dying sooner, so becoming a zombie sooner
Studies have shown lefties die up to 9 years sooner than righties. At least we’ll get to eat their brains.

12. These desks

These desks
College lecture hall desks with postage-stamp sizes desks. You have to twist your back and hold up your arm to use.

Source: srhbth

13. Measuring cups show you the stupid metric side

Measuring cups show you the stupid metric side
The cups/ounces side is for the righties. You have to do that thing where you twist your hole arm around to be able to read ounces.

Source: google.com

14. You, old friend

You, old friend

15. Made for righties

Made for righties
Apparently you can get modified lefty controllers, but maybe you should just go outside.

Source: google.com

16. Cord on the credit card machine pen never long enough

Cord on the credit card machine pen never long enough
Annoying. Annoying. I’m annoyed.

17. THIS

THIS
THE WORST

18. For which someone invented THESE

For which someone invented THESE
The saddest thing is that all the lefties in the BuzzFeed office now want these. The indignity.

Source: buywacom.com.au
 
Source: BuzzFeed

7 Things Your Nails Can Tell You About Your Health

Clues to potential problems are right at your fingertips

You spend so much time trimming, shaping, buffing, and painting your nails (or having someone else do all of that for you), but you probably don’t spend much time looking at them bare. And that means you may be missing spots, stripes, and odd colors that could indicate that something’s up—in a bad way—with your body.

While nothing replaces a visit to your physician for a proper diagnosis, checking your fingernails for the following abnormalities can help you spot early warning signs, so wipe off that polish and take a glance.

Close-up shot of pale, white nails
1. Pale Nails
The problem isn’t so black and white when it comes to white nails. If your fingernail beds are looking a little ghostly, you may have anemia, a blood disorder characterized by a low red blood cell count. “Anemia resulting from low levels of iron can lead to inadequate oxygen in the blood, which causes the

skin
and tissues to become pale, particularly the tissues under the nails,” says Shilpi Agarwal, M.D., a board-certified family medicine and integrative and holistic medicine physician in Los Angeles. Be sure you’re consuming good sources of iron, including green leafy vegetables, beans, and red meat, to boost your levels.

More seriously, pale nails could also be a sign of early diabetes or liver disease, both of which can lead to impaired blood flow. “When diagnosed early, diabetes can often be controlled with dietary changes,” Dr. Agarwal says. Avoid processed foods with refined sugars and carbs, and eat more fiber, vegetables, and whole grains. “These will help stabilize blood sugar levels and limit circulatory damage caused by uncontrolled sugar levels,” she says. For liver disease, a trip to the doc for testing is a must-do for accurate diagnosis.


While nothing replaces a visit to your physician for a proper diagnosis, checking your fingernails for the following abnormalities can help you spot early warning signs, so wipe off that polish and take a glance.

Thickened, yellow nails
2. Yellowing or Thickening
Yellow nails certainly don’t look pretty, and what causes the hue is even grosser: “Thickened nails, with or without a yellow-ish tone, are characteristic of fungal infections that generally traverse the entire nail bed,” Dr. Agarwal says. She adds that topical medication is often no help since the infection is in the nail bed and underlying nail plate. Your doctor can prescribe an oral med, which will reach the entire breadth of the infected nail.


While nothing replaces a visit to your physician for a proper diagnosis, checking your fingernails for the following abnormalities can help you spot early warning signs, so wipe off that polish and take a glance.

Dark stripes
3. Dark Lines
Even if you diligently check your skin for questionable moles monthly, you likely overlook your nails, a place where dangerous melanoma often goes unnoticed. “Dark brown or black vertical lines on the nail bed should never be ignored,” Dr. Agarwal warns. “These can be a hallmark sign of melanoma, which requires early detection and treatment.”

Leave your nails bare periodically so you can examine them, then go get a mani. “Sunlight is unable to penetrate through polish, so any shade other than a clear coat will provide an adequate barrier from the sun,” Dr. Agarwal says. Smart idea since your nails’ smooth surface makes it hard for sunscreen to be absorbed into the nail.


Pitted Nails
4. Pitting and Grooving
Depressions and small cracks in your nails are known as “pitting” of the nail bed and are often associated with psoriasis, an inflammatory disease that leads to scaly or red patches all over the body. “Individuals who suffer from psoriasis develop clusters of cells along the nail bed that accumulate and disrupt the linear, smooth growth of a normal nail,” Dr. Agarwal explains. “As these cells are sloughed off, grooves or depressed areas are left behind on the surface.” A physical exam is often all you need for a diagnosis, after which your doctor may recommend topical, oral, or injected medications or light therapy.

Lifted nails
5. Brittle, Thin, or Lifted Nails
Breaking a nail can be a bummer, but if your tips seem to crack at the slightest touch, it could mean your thyroid is amiss. This gland in your neck regulates metabolism, energy, and growth, and too little thyroid hormone often leads to hair loss, brittle and thin nails, and nails that grow slowly, Dr. Agarwal says.

Thyroid disorder also manifests itself by causing your nail plate to separate from the nail bed in a noticeable way. “Lifted nails are thought to occur because the increase in thyroid hormone can accelerate cell turnover and separate the nail from its natural linear growth pattern,” Dr. Agarwal explains.

Brittle, thin, slow-growing, or lifted, see your physician ASAP for a simple blood test that can check for thyroid disorder, which can be treated with medications.

White lines
6. White Lines
Stripes on your nails are only a good thing if they are painted on. Horizontal white lines that span the entire nail, are paired, and appear on more than one nail are called Muehrcke’s lines. These could be an indication of kidney disease, liver abnormalities, or a lack of protein and other nutrients, Dr. Agarwal says. “They are thought to be caused by a disruption in blood supply to the nail bed because of underlying disease,” she explains.

Shorter horizontal white marks or streaks, however, are likely just the result of trauma to the base of your nail. These may last from weeks to months and usually will disappear on their own.

Blue nails
7. Blue Nails
A blue face is a clear indication that someone’s lacking airflow, and blue nails mean the same thing—you’re not getting enough oxygen to your fingertips. This could be caused by respiratory disease or a vascular problem called Raynaud’s Disease, which is a rare disorder of the blood vessels, according to Dr. Agarwal. Some people just have slower blood circulation, especially when exposed to cold temperatures, she says, but have a physician check your blood and oxygenation levels if your nails are persistently blue.


Friday, June 21, 2013

Who Says "Y’all" And 10 Other Maps Showing Where Americans Say Things Differently

1. Basically no one calls it a soft drink.

Basically no one calls it a soft drink.

2. Y’all know that Kentucky is the only state where people really say “you all”?

Y'all know that Kentucky is the only state where people really say "you all"?

3. Philadelphia loves its hoagies, but it’s a sub pretty much everywhere else.

Philadelphia loves its hoagies, but it's a sub pretty much everywhere else.

4. The good news is that butter and sugar melted together tastes really great regardless of how you pronounce it.

The good news is that butter and sugar melted together tastes really great regardless of how you pronounce it.

5. Don’t expect to find many yard sales in the Midwest.

Don't expect to find many yard sales in the Midwest.

6. “Sneakers” exist pretty much only in the Northeast and southern Florida.

"Sneakers" exist pretty much only in the Northeast and southern Florida.

7. If you’re giving directions south of the Mason-Dixon, it’s called a “catty-corner.”

If you're giving directions south of the Mason-Dixon, it's called a "catty-corner."

8. The West Coast loves its “drinking fountains.”

The West Coast loves its "drinking fountains."

9. But doesn’t care much for “supper.”

But doesn't care much for "supper."

10. And everyone out there drives on the “freeway.”

And everyone out there drives on the "freeway."

11. Unfortunately, large parts of the country are not blessed with drive-through liquor stores. But in North Carolina and Virginia, they are wonderfully called “brew thrus.”

Unfortunately, large parts of the country are not blessed with drive-through liquor stores. But in North Carolina and Virginia, they are wonderfully called "brew thrus."
LINK

Check out all 122 maps here.

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Grandparents and Grandkids


Here's to all of us born before 1979!

First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank while they were pregnant. They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a can and didn't get tested for diabetes.Then after that trauma, we were put to sleep on our tummies in baby cribs covered with bright colored lead-base paints.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, locks on doors or cabinets and when we rode our bikes, we had baseball caps not helmets on our heads. As infants & children, we would ride in cars with no car seats, no booster seats, no seat belts, no air bags, bald tires and sometimes no brakes. Riding in the back of a pick- up truck on a warm day was always a special treat.


We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle. We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and no one actually died from this.

We ate cupcakes, white bread, real butter and bacon. We drank Kool-Aid made with real white sugar. And, we weren't overweight.. WHY?

Because we were always outside playing...that's why! We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the streetlights came on.. No one was able to reach us all day. And, we were OKAY. We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then ride them down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

We did not have Play Stations, Nintendo's and X-boxes. There were no video games, no 150 channels on cable, no video movies or DVD's, no surround-sound or CD's, no cell phones, no personal computers, no Internet and no chat rooms. WE HAD FRIENDS and we went outside and found them!

We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no lawsuits from these accidents. We would get spankings with wooden spoons, switches, ping pong paddles, or just a bare hand and no one would call child services to report abuse.
We ate worm and mud pies made from dirt, and the worms did not live in us forever. We were given BB guns for our 10th birthdays, made up games with sticks and tennis balls and, although we were told it would happen, we did not poke out very many eyes.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend's house and knocked on the door or rang the bell, or just walked in and talked to them.
Little League had tryouts and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that! The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law!

These generations have produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever. The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas. We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned how to deal with it all. If YOU are one of them, CONGRATULATIONS!

You might want to share this with others who have had the luck to grow up as kids, before the lawyers and the government regulated so much of our lives for our own good.

Kind of makes you want to run through the house with scissors, doesn't it?

Praline Brownies

Ingredients:

1 box (1 lb 2.3 oz) Betty Crocker® fudge brownie mix
plus the water, vegetable oil and eggs as called for on brownie mix box
1/2 cup chopped pecans

Praline Frosting

1/2 cup whipping cream
6 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups packed brown sugar
1/2 cup chopped pecans, toasted
1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla 


Directions:

Heat oven to 350° F. Spray bottom only of 13 x 9-inch pan with cooking spray. Make brownie mix as directed on box for fudge brownies, using water, oil and eggs. Stir in chopped pecans. Bake as directed. Cool completely, about 1 hour.

In medium saucepan, mix cream, butter and brown sugar. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until mixture comes to a boil. Continue cooking 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Stir in pecans, powdered sugar and vanilla. Cool 5 minutes, stirring frequently.

Spread frosting over brownies. Allow to stand 30 to 45 minutes, or until frosting is set. For bars, cut into 6 rows by 4 rows.


"Hometown Pride"

I love this beautiful painting by Thomas Kinkade....It's called Hometown Pride....It reminds me of the small town that I grew up in.

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Riding A Horse

Monday, I had a near death experience that has changed me forever. I went horseback riding. Everything was going fine until the horse starts bouncing out of control. I tried with all my might to hang on, but was thrown off. Just when things could not possibly get worse, my foot gets caught in the stirrup. When this happened, I fell head first to the ground. My head continued to bounce harder as the horse did not stop or even slow down. Just as I was giving up hope and losing consciousness the Wal-mart manager came and unplugged it.

Senior Discounts

Keep this list and send a copy to your senior friends and relatives.

As I was waiting in line behind an older gentleman at Wendy's recently, I heard him ask for his senior discount. The girl at the register apologized and charged him less. When I asked the man what the discount was, he told me that seniors over age 55 get 10% off everything on the menu, every day.
Being of 'that' age myself, I figured I might as well ask for the discount too.


This incident prompted me to do some research, and I came across a list of restaurants, supermarkets, department stores, travel deals and other types of offers giving various discounts with different age requirements. I was actually surprised to see how many there are and howsome of them start at the young age of 50 .


This list may not only be useful for you, but for your friends and family too.


Dunkin Donuts gives free coffee to people over 55 .


If you're paying for a cup every day, you might want to start getting it for FREE.

YOU ;mustASK for your discount !

RESTAURANTS:


Applebee's: 15% off with Golden Apple Card (60+)
Arby's: 10% off ( 55 +)
Ben & Jerry's: 10% off (60+)
Bennigan's: discount varies by location (60+)
Bob's Big Boy: discount varies by location (60+)
Boston Market: 10% off (65+)
Burger King: 10% off (60+)
Chick-Fil-A: 10% off or free small drink or coffee ( 55+)
Chili's: 10% off ( 55+)
CiCi's Pizza: 10% off (60+)
Denny's: 10% off, 20% off for AARP members ( 55 +)
Dunkin' Donuts: 10% off or free coffee ( 55+)
Einstein's Bagels: 10% off baker's dozen of bagels (60+)
Fuddrucker's: 10% off any senior platter ( 55+)
Gatti's Pizza: 10% off (60+)
Golden Corral: 10% off (60+)
Hardee's: $0.33 beverages everyday (65+)
IHOP: 10% off ( 55+)
Jack in the Box: up to 20% off ( 55+)
KFC: free small drink with any meal ( 55+)
Krispy Kreme: 10% off ( 50+)
Long John Silver's: various discounts at locations ( 55+)
McDonald's: discounts on coffee everyday ( 55+)
Mrs. Fields: 10% off at participating locations (60+)
Shoney's: 10% off
Sonic: 10% off or free beverage (60+)
Steak 'n Shake: 10% off every Monday & Tuesday ( 50+)
Subway: 10% off (60+)
Sweet Tomatoes: 10% off (62+)
Taco Bell : 5% off; free beverages for seniors (65+)
TCBY: 10% off ( 55+)
Tea Room Cafe: 10% off ( 50+)
Village Inn: 10% off (60+)
Waffle House: 10% off every Monday (60+)
Wendy's: 10% off ( 55 +)
Whataburger: 10% off (62+)
White Castle: 10% off (62+) This is for me ... if I ever see one again.

RETAIL & APPAREL:


Banana Republic: 30% off ( 50 +)
Bealls: 20% off first Tuesday of each month ( 50 +)
Belk's: 15% off first Tuesday of every month ( 55 +)
Big Lots: 30% off
Bon-Ton Department Stores: 15% off on senior discount days ( 55 +)
C.J. Banks: 10% off every Wednesday (50+)
Clarks : 10% off (62+)
Dress Barn: 20% off ( 55+)
Goodwill: 10% off one day a week (date varies by location)
Hallmark: 10% off one day a week (date varies by location)
Kmart: 40% off (Wednesdays only) ( 50+)
Kohl's: 15% off (60+)Modell's Sporting Goods: 30% off
Rite Aid: 10% off on Tuesdays & 10% off prescriptions
Ross Stores: 10% off every Tuesday ( 55+)
The Salvation Army Thrift Stores: up to 50% off ( 55+)
Stein Mart: 20% off red dot/clearance items first Monday of every month ( 55 +)

GROCERY:


Albertson's: 10% off first Wednesday of each month ( 55 +)
American Discount Stores: 10% off every Monday ( 50 +)
Compare Foods Supermarket: 10% off every Wednesday (60+)
DeCicco Family Markets: 5% off every Wednesday (60+)
Food Lion: 60% off every Monday (60+)
Fry's Supermarket: free Fry's VIP Club Membership & 10% off every Monday ( 55 +)
Great Valu Food Store: 5% off every Tuesday (60+)
Gristedes Supermarket: 10% off every Tuesday (60+)
Harris Teeter: 5% off every Tuesday (60+)
Hy-Vee: 5% off one day a week (date varies by location)
Kroger: 10% off (date varies by location)
Morton Williams Supermarket: 5% off every Tuesday (60+)
The Plant Shed: 10% off every Tuesday ( 50 +)
Publix: 15% off every Wednesday ( 55 +)
Rogers Marketplace: 5% off every Thursday (60+)
Uncle Guiseppe's Marketplace: 15% off (62+)

TRAVEL:


Airlines:


Alaska Airlines: 50% off (65+)
American Airlines: various discounts for 50% off non-peak periods (Tuesdays - Thursdays) (62+)and up (call before booking for discount)
Continental Airlines: no initiation fee for Continental Presidents Club & special fares for select destinations
Southwest Airlines: various discounts for ages 65 and up (call before booking for discount)
United Airlines: various discounts for ages 65 and up (call before booking for discount)
U.S. Airways: various discounts for ages 65 and up (call before booking for discount)


Rail:


Amtrak: 15% off (62+)


Bus:


Greyhound: 15% off (62+)
Trailways Transportation System: various discounts for ages 50+

Car Rental:


Alamo Car Rental: up to 25% off for AARP members
Avis: up to 25% off for AARP members
Budget Rental Cars: 40% off; up to 50% off for AARP members ( 50+)
Dollar Rent-A-Car: 10% off ( 50+) Enterprise Rent-A-Car: 5% off for AARP members Hertz: up to 25% off for AARP members
National Rent-A-Car: up to 30% off for AARP members

Overnight Accommodations:


Holiday Inn: 20-40% off depending on location (62+)
Best Western: 40% off (55+)
Cambria Suites: 20%-30% off (60+)
Waldorf Astoria - NYC $5,000 off nightly rate for Presidential Suite (55 +)
Clarion Motels: 20%-30% off (60+)
Comfort Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)
Comfort Suites: 20%-30% off (60+)
Econo Lodge: 40% off (60+)
Hampton Inns & Suites: 40% off when booked 72 hours in advance
Hyatt Hotels: 25%-50% off (62+)
InterContinental Hotels Group: various discounts at all hotels (65+)
Mainstay Suites: 10% off with Mature Traveler's Discount (50+); 20%-30% off (60+)
Marriott Hotels: 25% off (62+)
Motel 6: Stay Free Sunday nights (60+)
Myrtle Beach Resort: 30% off ( 55 +)
Quality Inn: 40%-50% off (60+)
Rodeway Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)
Sleep Inn: 40% off (60+)

ACTIVITIES & ENTERTAINMENT:


AMC Theaters: up to 30% off ( 55 +)
Bally Total Fitness: $100 off memberships (62+)
Busch Gardens Tampa, FL: $13 off one-day tickets ( 50 +)
Carmike Cinemas: 35% off (65+)
Cinemark/Century Theaters: up to 35% off
Massage Envy - NYC 20% off all "Happy Endings" (62 +)
U.S. National Parks: $10 lifetime pass; 50% off additional services including camping (62+)
Regal Cinemas: 50% off Ripley's Believe it or Not: @ off one-day ticket ( 55 +)
SeaWorld, Orlando , FL : $3 off one-day tickets ( 50 +)

CELL PHONE DISCOUNTS:


AT&T: Special Senior Nation 200 Plan $19.99/month (65+)
Jitterbug: $10/month cell phone service ( 50 +)
Verizon Wireless: Verizon Nationwide 65 Plus Plan $29.99/month (65+).

MISCELLANEOUS:


Great Clips: $8 off hair cuts (60+)
Supercuts: $8 off haircuts (60+)

NOW, go out there and claim your discounts - - - - and remember ----

YOU must ASK for your discount ---- no ask, no discount.


I Know everyone knows someone over 50 please pass the one on!

Monday, June 10, 2013

How are you building your life?

An elderly carpenter was ready to retire. He told his employer-contractor of his plans to leave the house building business and live a more leisurely life with his wife enjoying his extended family. He would miss the paycheck, but he needed to retire. They could get by.

The contractor was sorry to see his good worker go and asked if he could build just one more house as a personal favor. The carpenter said yes, but in time it was easy to see that his heart was not in his work. He resorted to shoddy workmanship and used inferior materials. It was an unfortunate way to end his career.

When the carpenter finished his work and the builder came to inspect the house, the contractor handed the front-door key to the carpenter. “This is your house,” he said, “my gift to you.”

What a shock! What a shame! If he had only known he was building his own house, he would have done it all so differently. Now he had to live in the home he had built none too well.

So it is with us. We build our lives in a distracted way, reacting rather than acting, willing to put up less than the best. At important points we do not give the job our best effort.

Then with a shock we look at the situation we have created and find that we are now living in the house we have built. If we had realized, we would have done it differently. Think of yourself as the carpenter. Think about your house. Each day you hammer a nail, place a board, or erect a wall. Build wisely. It is the only life you will ever build. Even if you live it for only one day more, that day deserves to be lived graciously and with dignity. The plaque on the wall says, “Life is a do-it-yourself project.” Who could say it more clearly? Your life today is the result of your attitudes and choices in the past. Your life tomorrow will be the result of your attitudes and the choices you make today.

Author Unknown

Welcome To The 21st Century!!

Our Phones ~ Wireless

Cooking ~ Fireless 

Cars ~ Keyless 

Food ~ Fatless 

Tires ~ Tubeless

Dress ~ Sleeveless 

Youth ~ Jobless
Leaders ~ Shameless
Relationships ~ Meaningless
Attitude ~ Careless
Wives ~ Fearless
Babies ~ Fatherless
Feelings ~ Heartless
Education ~ Valueless
Children ~ Mannerless
Everything is becoming LESS but still our 
hopes are~ Endless.
 
In fact we are ~ Speechless

10 Free Learning Websites For Kids

Sites:

Switcheroozoo 


National Geographic For Kids

Into The Book 

Seussville 

ABC Ya

FunBrain

PBS Kids

Star Fall

Storyline Online

Highlights For Kids








Eight Ingredients You Never Want to See on Your Nutrition Label

1. BHA
 
... This preservative is used to prevent rancidity in foods that contain oils. Unfortunately, BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) has been shown to cause cancer i
n rats, mice, and hamsters. The reason the FDA hasn’t banned it is largely technical—the cancers all occurred in the rodents’ forestomachs, an organ that humans don’t have. Nevertheless, the study, published in the Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, concluded that BHA was “reasonably anticipated to be a carcinogen,” and as far as I’m concerned, that’s reason enough to eliminate it from your diet.

2. Parabens

 
These synthetic preservatives are used to inhibit mold and yeast in food. The problem is parabens may also disrupt your body’s hormonal balance. A study in Food Chemical Toxicology found that daily ingestion decreased sperm and testosterone production in rats, and parabens have been found present in breast cancer tissues.

3. Partially Hydrogenated Oil


I’ve harped on this before, but it bears repeating: Don’t confuse “0 g trans fat” with being trans fat-free. The FDA allows products to claim zero grams of trans fat as long as they have less than half a gram per serving. That means they can have 0.49 grams per serving and still be labeled a no-trans-fat food. Considering that two grams is the absolute most you ought to consume in a day, those fractions can quickly add up. The telltale sign that your snack is soiled with the stuff? Look for partially hydrogenated oil on the ingredient statement. If it’s anywhere on there, then you’re ingesting artery-clogging trans fat.

4. Sodium Nitrite


Nitrites and nitrates are used to inhibit botulism-causing bacteria and to maintain processed meats’ pink hues, which is why the FDA allows their use. Unfortunately, once ingested, nitrite can fuse with amino acids (of which meat is a prime source) to form nitrosamines, powerful carcinogenic compounds. Ascorbic and erythorbic acids—essentially vitamin C—have been shown to decrease the risk, and most manufacturers now add one or both to their products, which has helped. Still, the best way to reduce risk is to limit your intake.

5. Caramel Coloring


This additive wouldn’t be dangerous if you made it the old-fashioned way—with water and sugar, on top of a stove. But the food industry follows a different recipe: They treat sugar with ammonia, which can produce some nasty carcinogens. How carcinogenic are these compounds? A Center for Science in the Public Interest report asserted that the high levels of caramel color found in soda account for roughly 15,000 cancers in the U.S. annually. Another good reason to scrap soft drinks? They’re among The 20 Worst Drinks in America.

6. Castoreum


Castoreum is one of the many nebulous “natural ingredients” used to flavor food. Though it isn’t harmful, it is unsettling. Castoreum is a substance made from beavers’ castor sacs, or anal scent glands. These glands produce potent secretions that help the animals mark their territory in the wild. In the food industry, however, 1,000 pounds of the unsavory ingredient are used annually to imbue foods—usually vanilla or raspberry flavored—with a distinctive, musky flavor.

7. Food Dyes


Plenty of fruit-flavored candies and sugary cereals don’t contain a single gram of produce, but instead rely on artificial dyes and flavorings to suggest a relationship with nature. Not only do these dyes allow manufacturers to mask the drab colors of heavily processed foods, but certain hues have been linked to more serious ailments. A Journal of Pediatrics study linked Yellow 5 to hyperactivity in children, Canadian researchers found Yellow 6 and Red 40 to be contaminated with known carcinogens, and Red 3 is known to cause tumors. The bottom line? Avoid artificial dyes as much as possible.

8. Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein


Hydrolyzed vegetable protein, used as a flavor enhancer, is plant protein that has been chemically broken down into amino acids. One of these acids, glutamic acid, can release free glutamate. When this glutamate joins with free sodium in your body, they form monosodium glutamate (MSG), an additive known to cause adverse reactions—headaches, nausea, and weakness, among others—in sensitive individuals. When MSG is added to products directly, the FDA requires manufacturers to disclose its inclusion on the ingredient statement. But when it occurs as a byproduct of hydrolyzed protein, the FDA allows it to go unrecognized.

What Mr. Clean Magic Erasers Can Do.

remove dried paint from door hinges
remove tarnish from silver
... remove mold & mildew from anything plastic
clean & polish gold jewelry
remove soap scum in the tub and shower
remove marks on walls
clean splatters inside the microwave
remove marks on vinyl siding
clean mirrors in the bathroom (keeps shower mirrors from fogging)
remove adhesive residue after removing stickers
remove waterline mark around the pool
remove hair dye from counter tops & floors
clean light-colored suede
remove black scuff marks from baseboards (where the vacuum cleaner hits)
clean the outdoor side of window sills stained from leaves, dust and dirt
clean plastic coolers inside and out (…even dirty grimy ones used by men with greasy hands!)
remove rust spots & stains on counter top
remove cooked-on stains in pots and pans
remove soot off the walls near the fireplace
clean within the grooves of lawn ornaments
clean sticky/dusty range hood over the stove
remove nail polish spills or stains
clean air bake cookie sheets & bake ware (the kind with all those tiny grooves)
clean oven shelves & the grates on the grill
remove wet nose marks from pets on the windows (even car windows)
remove toothpaste splashes from bathroom mirrors
remove melted plastic on the side of the toaster oven
remove grimy green algae from cement (bird baths, steps, ponds, etc)
clean stained elbows from dirty work
remove green mildew from siding and gutters
remove paint spills & oversprays
remove toilet bowl rings (cut a piece off & let it set in your toilet overnight; don’t flush it; doesn’t always work)
remove built-up algae, water deposits, etc from ceramic flower pots
clean dish drainers that are gunked with lime and build-up
remove bird poop from concrete bird bath
remove coffee & tea stains that remain inside a mug, caraffe, thermos even after washing
clean the plastic agitator inside your washing machine
clean window screens (even when they are still in the window)
remove built-up baked on grease inside the deep fryer
clean inside the crock pot
remove melted plastic on a glass top stove
clean swimming pool steps
remove baked on brown spots on cookware
clean antiques & collectibles
polish collectible coins (UPDATE: coin experts recommend that you do NOT clean coins.)
clean & shine things up before you sell them in a yard sale
clean boat & outdoor furniture upholstery
clean vinyl striping on motorhomes, vans, boats
clean car tires, including white walls
clean pebbled surfaces like the outside of plastic coolers
remove pet & child vomit from carpet or clothing
remove scuff marks on motorcycle & ATV helmets
remove grass stains from shoes after mowing the lawn
remove scuff marks from hangers/shoes in the walk-in closet
clean oven door
remove pollen from patio furniture, cars, etc.
remove soap scum and gunk from around the bathroom faucets
remove hairspray build-up on countertops and vanities
remove soap scum inside porcelain & utility sinks
clean stained caulking along the kitchen sink & countertop
clean your bicycle, even the tires & rims
clean tile & grout
remove mildew from tents, vinyl canopies, awnings, fiberglass items
remove paint overspray that has dried
remove shoe marks from the kickplate of house doors & car doors
clean inside your car (along the handles, window ledge, arm rests, dashboard)
remove scuff marks and dirt from linoleum floors
remove stains on leather seats, purses, chairs, etc.
remove food stains inside plastic food containers
remove brake dust from tire rims
remove dirt and grime on a vinyl convertible top
remove nail polish from walls, carpets, wooden objects, plastic
remove soil or scuff marks from ceramic tile flooring
clean non-skid surfaces with tiny grooves (bathtub floors, refrigerator handles, pool steps, cooler lids)
clean & shine bathroom faucets & fixtures
remove magic marker, permanent marker, and ballpoint ink from virtually any surface
clean doll faces
clean textured handles on major appliances (dishwasher, refrigerator, stove)
remove fingerprints and dirt on light-colored kitchen cupboards
clean inside of the refrigerator
remove crayon marks from walls
remove dirt from plastic trash cans
remove dark paint on light-colored carpet
clean soap scum and oils from hot tub
clean a car’s vinyl interior (gets into the tiny crinkles in the vinyl armrest, etc.)
clean white porch railings, columns & pillars
remove bugs from car windshield, grille, and bumper
remove paint scratches on your car from minor fender benders
remove rust and corrosion that’s built-up on the outside of pipes (kitchen/bathroom)
clean & shine hubcaps
remove built-up grime on the car steering wheel
remove finger prints & build-up on the keyboard and mouse
remove oxidized paint from an old car
remove built-up gunk from vinyl seats
remove tar from your car’s paint
remove set-in stains inside glass and plastic pitchers
remove scuff marks from the back of car seats (from kids’ shoes)
clean kids’ plastic toys
remove dirt and grime from athletic shoes and shoes with leather uppers
remove stains on the underside of the toilet seat
remove fingerprint & handprints from light-colored doors & walls
remove scuff marks from your patio furniture

How To Get The Most Out Of Magic Erasers:

The only downside to these eraser blocks is that they don’t last long. But that’s a testament to their cleaning power — their tiny pores get filled with all the gunk that’s hiding in small spaces.

To get more life out of your Magic Erasers, try this:
1. Cut each Magic Eraser into 4 equal-sized pieces (across the shortest width of the eraser, rather than lengthwise). This way, you get 4 times the amount of cleaning out of one Eraser!
2. Lightly mist it with water (by misting or using the kitchen sink sprayer), rather than saturating it with water — which causes it to shrivel up more.
3. Scrub lightly with the Magic Eraser, then wipe the area with a wet towel to prevent smearing the dirt/grime and remove any residue.
4. When it starts to get yucky (after cleaning a few different items), simply spray rinse it again to revive it a bit. Then squeeze the excess water out, and continue using it until it starts to shred.

Leptospirosis From Soda Cans



On a Sunday a family went to picnic with a few drinks in tin cans. Monday, two family members were admitted to the hospital and placed in Intensive Care Unit. He died on Wednesday. Autopsy results concluded it was Leptospirosis. The virus was... stuck to the tin cans and consumed, without the use of glasses / cups. Test results showed that the tin was contaminated because mice urinated on them, and then it dried. The urine contained Leptospira. I Highly recommend to rinse the parts evenly on all soda cans before drinking it. Cans are usually stored in the warehouse and delivered direct to retail stores without cleaning. A study shows that the top of all beverage cans are more contaminated than public toilets (full of germs and bacteria.)So, clean it with water before drinking in order to prevent this from occurring.

Know Your Steak


BBQ Season is here... Be prepared!

1. TOP ROUND (AKA London broil)


Very lean with mild flavor; dense and slightly chewy.
Inexpensive with no fat to trim off, so more meat for your money; even shape makes it easy to slice thin.
Marinating will tenderize the meat.
Best served rare to medium (overcooking will turn this cut into leather).
Must be carved very thin, against the grain.
Great cold for sandwiches.
"Best Buy"

2. RIB EYE (AKA Delmonico steak)


Naturally tender cut cooks up juicy, with a rich flavor of caramelized meat.
Can be sold bone-in for rib lovers and for a more dramatic presentation.
Lots of marbling makes it self-basting.
These steaks are pricey, so look for ones with a large "eye" and less surrounding fat.

3. FILET MIGNON
(AKA tenderloin steak)

Its mild flavor and tenderness make it the perfect canvas for a starring sauce.
Expensive, but unlike other cuts, it doesn't need to be trimmed and doesn't shrink much during cooking.
Avoid acidic marinades -- they'll deteriorate the fine grain and make the meat mealy.
Best eaten rare to medium.
Lean and tender enough to be eaten cold.
Skip the steak knife -- it cuts like butter!

4. T-BONE


Nothing says "steakhouse" like a T-bone. Great for steak lovers who eat with their eyes first.
Combines two contrasting cuts in one sitting -- part of the delicate tenderloin and robust, juicy strip.
The bone adds flavor and seals in juices.
Perfect for carnivores who feel the meat's just a vehicle for getting to gnaw on the bone.

5. SKIRT STEAK (AKA fajita steak)
Good bang for your buck -- juicy and flavorful; quick-cooking and versatile.
Firm, accordion-like grain soaks up dry rubs and marinades.
Best served rare to medium-rare. Anything more toughens the meat.
"Best Buy"

6. STRIP LOIN
(AKA strip steak, New York strip steak; shell steak)

A beef-lover's steak -- you can really taste the steer.
A trophy cut -- tenderness, succulence and a satisfying chew.
Low maintenance: cooks evenly, ideal for a variety of cooking methods (grilling, broiling and pan-roasting).
Serve rare or medium-rare: This cut turns mealy when overcooked.
"Best Buy"

"We Didn't Have The Green Thing."

Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the older woman, that she should bring her own grocery bags because plastic bags weren't good for the environment.
The woman apologized and explained, "We didn't have this green thing back in my earlier days." The young clerk responded, "That's our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment f or future generations."

She was right -- our generation didn't have the green thing in its day.

Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were truly recycled. But we didn't have the green thing back in our day.

Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags, that we reused for numerous things, most memorable besides household garbage bags, was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our schoolbooks. This was to ensure that public property, (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribbling's. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags. But too bad we didn't do the green thing back then.

We walked up stairs, because we didn't have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn't climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks. But she was right. We didn't have the green thing in our day.

Back then, we washed the baby's diapers because we didn't have the throwaway kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts -- wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing. But that young lady is right; we didn't have the green thing back in our day.

Back then, we had one TV, or radio, in the house -- not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana.

In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn't have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap.

Back then, we didn't fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn't need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity. But she's right; we didn't have the green thing back then.

We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull. But we didn't have the green thing back then.

Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service. We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn't need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint.

But isn't it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn't have the green thing back then?

Please forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in conservation from a smart-ass young person.

Monday, June 3, 2013

Burned Biscuits

When I was a little child, my mom liked to make breakfast food for dinner every now and then. And I remember one night in particular when she had made breakfast after a long, hard day at work.
 
On that evening so long ago, my mom placed a plate of eggs, sausage and extremely burned biscuits in front of my dad. I remember waiting to see if anyone noticed! Yet all my dad did was reach for his biscuit, smile at my mom and ask me how my day was at school. I don’t remember what I told him that night, but I do remember watching him smear butter and jelly on that biscuit and eat every bite!

When I got up from the table that evening, I remember hearing my mom apologize to my dad for burning the biscuits. And I’ll never forget what he said: “Baby, I love burned biscuits.”

Later that night, I went to kiss Daddy good night and I asked him if he really liked his biscuits burned. He wrapped me in his arms and said, “Your Momma put in a hard day at work today and she’s real tired. And besides – a little burned biscuit never hurt anyone!”

You know, life is full of imperfect things… and imperfect people. I’m not the best housekeeper or cook. What I’ve learned over the years is that learning to accept each other’s faults – and choosing to celebrate each other’s differences – is one of the most important keys to creating a healthy, growing, and lasting relationship. And that’s my prayer for you today!
By Deb Billy Graham

The Ultimate Summer Bucket List

100 Fun ideas by kids for kids!
 
1. Picnic at the park
2. Play in a kiddie pool
3. Make smores
4. Homemade pizza party
5. Make pet rocks
6. Have a cousin sleepover
7. Make a lemonade stand
8. Go to a summer matinee
9. Tie dye t-shirts
10. Write your own story
11. Scavenger hunt walk
12. Lunch with dad at work
13. Attend story time at the library
14. Make ice cream in a baggie
15. Visit an IMAX theater
16. Fondue night
17. Catch fireflies or bugs
18. Have a water balloon fight
19. Make journals
20. Go to a parade
21. Make homemade jam
22. Hunt for shapes in the clouds
23. Go to a water splash pad
24. Play Legos
25. Go fishing
26. Build an indoor fort using blankets
27. Go bowling
28. Backyard water games
29. Go to a baseball game
30. Go to the zoo
31. Have a fun summer reading program
32. Family bike ride
33. Catch fireflies
34. Learn to swim or go swimming
35. Make a time capsule
36. Go bird watching
37. Make homemade popsicles
38. Play catch
39. Llearn how to play a new board game
40. Go see a fireworks show
41. Mail a letter to someone special
42. Attend a kids workshop at Home Depot or Lowe’s
43. Outdoor movie night
44. Make 4th of July shirts
45. Learn to hula hoop
46. Play dress up
47. Go to a drive-in movie
48. Bake cookies
49. Fly a kite
50. Go on a road trip
51. Do a fun science project
52. Go camping
53. Make a bird feeder
54. Play hopscotch
55. Make paper airplanes and race
56. Make sail boats and race
57. Set up or make a slip n slide
58. Play mini golf
59. Skip rocks in a river
60. Make smoothies
61. Go to a children’s museum
62. Start a rock collection
63. Plant a garden
64. Have a family talent show
65. Run in the sprinklers
66. Make friendship bracelets
67. Create sidewalk art using chalk
68. Have a yard sale and let the kids help
69. Make homemade bubbles
70. Go to an amusement park
71. Make princess crowns or hero capes
72. Make homemade play dough
73. Do a jigsaw puzzle
74. Have a pillow fight
75. Play mini golf
76. Camping in the backyard
77. Make sand castles at the park or beach
78. Make or go get snow cones
79. Go the the local fair
80. Homemade marshmallow guns
81. Make a video
82. Catch butterflies with nets
83. Make homemade instruments
84. Go horseback riding
85. Decorate cupcakes or cookies
86. Go to an outdoor concert
87. Have a treasure hunt
88. Play Frisbee
89. Make sun catchers
90. Visit a nature center
91. Go to the beach
92. Collect sea shells
93. Go a local farmer’s market
94. Have a puppet show
95. Make root beer floats
96. Have an ice cream party with lots of toppings
97. Make recycled crayons
98. Go to the skate park or a skating rink
99. Favorite movies marathon
100. Make treats for neighbors

Saturday, June 1, 2013

The Important Things In Life

A philosophy professor stood before his class with some items on the table in front of him. When the class began, wordlessly he picked up a very large and empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with rocks, about 2 inches in diameter.

He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.

So the professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles, of course, rolled into the open areas between the rocks.

He then asked the students again if the jar was full. They agreed it was.

The professor picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else.

He then asked once more if the jar was full. The students responded with a unanimous “Yes.”

“Now,” said the professor, “I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life. The rocks are the important things – your family, your partner, your health, your children – things that if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full.

The pebbles are the other things that matter – like your job, your house, your car.

The sand is everything else. The small stuff.”

“If you put the sand into the jar first,” he continued “there is no room for the pebbles or the rocks. The same goes for your life.

If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff, you will never have room for the things that are important to you. Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Play with your children. Take your partner out dancing. There will always be time to go to work, clean the house, give a dinner party and fix the disposal.

Take care of the rocks first – the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.”

Author Unknown